Boy Scout hat and handkerchief
02/18/20

The Boy Scouts filed for bankruptcy after facing hundreds of new allegations of sexual abuse

Facing a wave of lawsuits and decades-old allegations of sexual abuse, the Boy Scouts of America filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy on Tuesday, complicating the path to justice for the thousands of former Scouts who say they were abused during their time in the storied American institution.

The organization filed just after midnight in the US Bankruptcy Court in Delaware, ending months of speculation that it would take such an action. The filing covers the national organization but excludes its local councils. These entities operate troops and hold about 70% of the organization’s wealth, a Wall Street Journal analysis found.

The Boy Scouts have experienced over a decade of tumult from declining membership, the dissolution of key partnerships, controversy over their decision to allow gay and female members, and scrutiny over the extent to which child predators operated within their ranks.

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Compass
02/18/20

Boy Scouts seek bankruptcy under wave of new sex abuse lawsuits

The Boy Scouts of America, one of the nation’s oldest and largest youth organizations, filed for bankruptcy protection late Monday as former Scouts’ legal claims of past sexual abuse continue to mount.

The Scouts’ Chapter 11 petition, filed in Bankruptcy Court in Delaware, comes amid declining membership and a wave of new sex-abuse lawsuits after several states, including California, New York and New Jersey, recently expanded legal options for childhood victims to sue.

California’s law, AB 218, took effect in January and, among other provisions, opens a three-year “lookback window” for victims to sue for damages on claims previously barred by statutes of limitation. It also relaxes age restrictions on filing claims, giving victims until age 40 or five years after they become aware of injury caused by abuse.

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Outdoors camp fire
02/18/20

Minnesota scout leaders support extra safety policies as national group files for bankruptcy

The Northern Star Council said it doesn’t receive money from the national organization for its $21 million budget and is “separately incorporated,” a spokesman said.

Boy Scout leaders in Minnesota say they’ve implemented new child safety policies in the years since sexual abuse allegations surfaced and are moving forward after the national Boy Scouts of America (BSA) filed for bankruptcy Monday in the wake of misconduct settlements across the U.S.

New guidelines established last year require any adult troop or pack leader to complete two hours of online instruction and have a background check every year as part of the Scouts’ mandatory youth protection training.

The national organization doubled its fees for leaders to cover the extra expenses, and volunteers with the Northern Star Council that serves about 54,000 Scouts in Minnesota and Wisconsin said those efforts make the organization stronger.

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Camp grounds overlooking lake
02/18/20

Boy Scouts of America files for bankruptcy amid wave of potential lawsuits

Facing a wave of lawsuits over allegations of sexual abuse, the Boy Scouts of America has filed for bankruptcy.

The long-anticipated Chapter 11 bankruptcy filing will allow the Boy Scouts to keep operating as it reorganizes its finances and handles claims from hundreds of potential victims. It will also give alleged victims a limited amount of time to come forward before being barred indefinitely from seeking compensation. “The BSA cares deeply about all victims of abuse and sincerely apologizes to anyone who was harmed during their time in Scouting. We are outraged that there have been times when individuals took advantage of our programs to harm innocent children,” Roger Mosby, the president and CEO of the Boy Scouts of America, said in a statement released around 1 a.m. Tuesday. “While we know nothing can undo the tragic abuse that victims suffered, we believe the Chapter 11 process — with the proposed Trust structure — will provide equitable compensation to all victims while maintaining the BSA’s important mission.”

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Roped tied in a knot
02/18/20

Boy Scouts of America files for bankruptcy due to sex-abuse lawsuits

Barraged by hundreds of sex-abuse lawsuits, the Boy Scouts of America filed for bankruptcy protection Tuesday in hopes of working out a potentially mammoth victim compensation plan that will allow the hallowed, 110-year-old organization to carry on.

The Chapter 11 filing in federal bankruptcy court in Wilmington, Delaware, sets in motion what could be one of the biggest, most complex bankruptcies ever seen. Scores of lawyers are seeking settlements on behalf of several thousand men who say they were molested as scouts by scoutmasters or other leaders decades ago but are only now eligible to sue because of recent changes in their states’ statute-of-limitations laws.

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02/18/20

Facing a Wave of Sex-Abuse Claims, Boy Scouts of America Files for Bankruptcy

The nonprofit group, which counts more than two million youth participants, follows Catholic dioceses and U.S.A. Gymnastics in seeking bankruptcy protection amid sex-abuse cases.

The Boy Scouts of America, an iconic presence in the nation’s experience for more than a century, filed for bankruptcy protection early Tuesday, succumbing to financial pressures that included a surge in legal costs over its handling of sexual abuse allegations.

Founded in 1910, the Boy Scouts have long maintained internal files at their headquarters in Texas detailing decades of allegations involving nearly 8,000 “perpetrators,” according to an expert hired by the organization. Lawyers have said in recent months that former scouts have come forward to identify hundreds of other abusers not included in those files.

The bankruptcy filing, in Delaware, is expected to disrupt continuing litigation and establish a deadline for when former scouts can pursue claims.

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Camping tents
02/18/20

Boy Scouts Of America Files For Bankruptcy Over Sex Abuse Claims

The Boy Scouts of America (BSA) has filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy so that it can fund a string of lawsuits surrounding alleged child sex abuse stretching more than 70 years.

  • The BSA announced on Tuesday that the filing would allow them to create a Victims Compensation Trust, after hundreds of lawsuits accuse scout leaders of molesting former scouts. Most of the cases, representing thousands of men, allege abuse between the 1960s and 1980s.
  • BSA could be made to sell off some property and campgrounds to fund the trust. The 110-year-old organization said the filing would allow it to keep scouting programs going for “many years to come.”
  • BSA CEO, Roger Mosby, said: “The BSA cares deeply about all victims of abuse and sincerely apologizes to anyone who was harmed during their time in Scouting. We are outraged that there have been times when individuals took advantage of our programs to harm innocent children.”
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People around camp fire
02/18/20

Boy Scouts of America file for bankruptcy

The Boy Scouts of America, rocked by scandal and steadily declining membership, filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy early Tuesday morning.

The move had been rumored for months, with the BSA facing roughly 300 lawsuits alleging sexual abuse by adult volunteers. Still, in a country largely shaped by Boy Scouts, it’s a storyline few would have predicted. Five former U.S. presidents were members. So were the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr., Atlanta Braves legend Hank Aaron and Microsoft co-founder Bill Gates. Its ranks also included tens of thousands of boys sexually abused by adult volunteers, according to an internal review by the organization. But those perpetrators were rarely held responsible.

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Camp grounds overlooking lake
02/18/20

Boy Scouts files Chapter 11 bankruptcy in the face of thousands of child abuse allegations

Boy Scouts of America filed for bankruptcy protection early today amid declining membership and a drumbeat of child sexual abuse allegations that have illuminated the depth of the problem within the organization and Scouts’ failure to get a handle on it.

After months of speculation and mounting civil litigation, the Chapter 11 filing by the scouting organization’s national body was unprecedented in both scope and complexity. It was filed in Delaware Bankruptcy Court overnight.

The exact effects on Boy Scouts’ future operations are unknown, leading to speculation about the organization’s odds for survival, the impact on local troops and how bankruptcy could change the dynamic for abuse survivors who have yet to come forward. Some fear that at a minimum it will prevent survivors from naming their abuser in open court.

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Welcome scouts camp sign
02/18/20

Boy Scouts of America files for bankruptcy amid wave of potential lawsuits

Facing a wave of lawsuits over allegations of sexual abuse, the Boy Scouts of America has filed for bankruptcy.

The long-anticipated Chapter 11 filing will allow the Boy Scouts to keep operating as it reorganizes its finances and handles claims from hundreds of potential victims. It will also give alleged victims a limited amount of time to come forward before being barred indefinitely from seeking compensation.

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