Sexual Abuse

Will Yeshiva Make Abuse Report Public?

By Paul Berger
The Jewish Daily Forward
January 10, 2013

Alleged Victims Worry About Probe’s Scope and Transparency

Yeshiva University has declined to say if it will make public the results of an investigation into sexual abuse allegations at its Manhattan high school despite former students’ fears about the scope, openness and motivation behind the probe.

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Abusers, Abettors Deserve Public Wrath

By Paul Mones and Kelly Clark
The Oregonian
Thursday, February 21, 2008

The Oregonian series on sexual abuse in the public schools is as important a piece of journalism as the landmark 2002 Boston Globe series on the sexual abuse scandal in the Catholic Church.

Those school districts, administrators, teachers and teacher union representatives — who The Oregonian exposed as turning a blind eye to the pain, suffering and exploitation of children and teens — are every bit deserved of the public’s wrath as the bishops and priests who condoned and conspired to cover up the sexual abuse of children by priests. The power exercised by the teachers union in protecting its own is what dioceses have historically done with respect to predatory priests.

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Offender may return to state Man who pleaded guilty to sodomy in N.Y. runs Colo. firm

By Carol Kreck
The Denver Post
May 15, 2002

A part-time Colorado resident who pleaded guilty to  repeatedly sodomizing a Boy Scout in New York is being allowed to  return to Colorado for the summer to resume running a tour  business for Scouts and students.

Jerrold Schwartz, 42, former scoutmaster of a New York City  troop, pleaded guilty last week in New York to the sodomy charge.

He was allowed to remain free on $ 25,000 bail and travel to  Colorado, where he is president of Adventure Trails Inc.

Schwartz could get from 2 2/3 to eight years in prison,  according to Sherry Hunter, spokeswoman for the Manhattan district  attorney’s office. Sentencing is scheduled in August. Schwartz  asked to serve his sentence in Colorado.

Schwartz was scoutmaster of Troop 666 based at a church in  New York City. He pleaded guilty to four counts of deviant sexual  intercourse with a 16-year-old boy from September to December 1996.

The victim was 12 when the abuse began, according to attorney  Paul Mones, who is involved in a $ 150 million civil suit on the  young man’s behalf. A New York prosecutor said Schwartz even  assaulted the boy on Schwartz’s wedding day.

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Sex-Abuse Lawsuit Names Ex-Teacher and Archdiocese

 

The New York Times Company
September 15, 2000

In the 1980’s, in the quiet parish of St. Frances de Chantal in Throgs Neck, the Bronx, Linda Baisi was teaching junior high school. A former nun, she had left the convent and rented an apartment from the parish school secretary.

And in that apartment, according to a young man who knew her as teacher and confirmation sponsor, Ms. Baisi carried on a sexual relationship with him from the time he was 12 years old until his sophomore year in high school, later giving him gifts, leaving cash for him in envelopes at the rectory and begging him to keep the encounters a secret.

Now, in a civil case that will test the legal responsibility of the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of New York as well as the school and its former teacher, the former student, Brian O’Rourke, 25, claims that he was tormented for years and has only recently managed to overcome drug and alcohol problems.

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The Fight Against Child Abuse

 

Oregonlive.com
By Paul Mones
June 02, 2009

Our state legislators are in the midst of dealing with one of the worst fiscal crises in recent memory. No doubt they will have to make many tough, unpopular decisions this year. However there is one legislative decision they need not fret over because it is a no-brainer. House Bill 2827 is a simple piece of legislation that gives an extra measure of justice to victims of child abuse.

In the words of one of the bill’s co-sponsors Chris Garrett (D-Lake Oswego ) – the other sponsor is Rep. Andy Olson (R-Albany) – this bill “will ensure an effective civil remedy for victims of child abuse.”

The bill extends the present statute of limitations by giving victims until the age of 40 to file an action against their abuser, requiring that claims be initiated by the time the victim turns 40 years old or within five years of when the injury or the connection between the abuse and the injury is discovered. The bill has unanimously passed the house but curiously has not received the same overwhelmingly positive reception in the Senate.

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